Sarah Elaine Smith - Marilou is Everywhere - Book review by Marc Louis-Boyard for Slow Culture

BOOK REVIEW #8 – Sarah Elaine Smith, Marilou is Everywhere (Penguin Random House)

Sarah Elaine Smith’s Marilou is Everywhere was published a few months ago, and is now getting a due and essential reissue.

The plot of the book is not revolutionary itself, but the reader’s experience is the true and spectacular value delivered by the author.

Consumed by the longing for a different life, a teenager flees her family and carefully slips into another — replacing a girl whose own sudden disappearance still haunts the town.

– Excerpt from the press release.

Do not expect a dark and depressing ride. Marilou is Everywhere is an excellent reminder of the human condition, and of the humans’ shared desires. This piece is the perfect balance between Louisa Luna’s Brave New Girl and Juliet Escoria’s Juliet The Maniac.

Three keywords to describe the book: growth, adventure, consciousness.

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Keith Kahn-Harris, Denial: The Unspeakable Truth - Book review by Marc Louis-Boyard for Slow Culture

BOOK REVIEW #7 – Keith Kahn-Harris, Denial: The Unspeakable Truth (Notting Hill Editions)

With Denial: The Unspeakable Truth (Notting Hill Editions), Keith Kahn-Harris discusses a burning, sensitive, critical societal topic. If you had the opportunity to enjoy our review of John Berger’s What Time Is It? from the same publisher, be warned that this book is a very different matter. But not for worse.

Freshness of spirit and entertainment are not absent from Keith Kahn-Harris’ literary world and reflections, but do not expect a happy ending or some kind of burst of hope. Denial: The Unspeakable Truth is raw power that is not on a “rounding the corners” mission.

That being said, this book contributes to sharpen the view one can have on society, not with never-ending complaints disguised as weapons, but with an enlightened and elaborated train of thought that is not afraid to expose the incongruous and the dangerous.

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John Berger & Selçuk Demirel - What Time Is It - Book review by Slow Culture

BOOK REVIEW #6 – John Berger & Selçuk Demirel, What Time Is It? (Notting Hill Editions)

The story behind the production of What Time Is It? is essentially meta. What Time Is It? is the result of a continuous battle against time for the sake of literary production. For the sake of material too precious to be lost or put on hold.

John Berger (1928 – 2017) hardly needs any introduction. The award-winning author of the renowned About Looking and Ways of Seeing  would be immensely proud of this finished opus, magnified by Italian translator Maria Nadotti’s introduction.

Notting Hill Editions released this book two years after Berger’s passing. This publication is also proving once again Notting Hill Edition’s legendary sense of tradition in modernity, et vice versa. What Time Is It? is a highly valuable handbook, made for the pleasure of the senses and the joy of knowledge.

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Book Review of Annabel Banks' Exercises In Control by Marc Louis-Boyard for Slow Culture

BOOK REVIEW #5 – Annabel Banks, Exercises In Control (February 2020)

Annabel Banks finally releases her first (and anticipated) collection of stories entitled Exercises In Control (Influx Press), and we loved it. 

Beyond passive recognition, these stories are still resonating in our mind after three readings. You should follow this path, because this book mattered to us more than we could expect. Here are our thoughts on this dangerously delicious selection.

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Car Park Life by Gareth E.Rees book review cover

BOOK REVIEW #3 – Gareth E. Rees, Car Park Life

Gareth E. Rees’ Car Park Life (Influx press) joins Juliet Escoria’s Juliet The Maniac on the list of our 2019 favorite pieces of non-fiction.

Expecting at first a light read full of entertaining and easy anecdotes, we understood in the first ten pages how rich and enlightening our reading would become.

We do not drive, but Car Park Life immersed us in a scene that is even unknown to your typical retail store wanderer or to your classic car park daydreamer.

Gareth E. Rees’ third book is serious field research. Here begins your sociological journey.

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