John Berger & Selçuk Demirel - What Time Is It - Book review by Slow Culture

BOOK REVIEW #6 – John Berger & Selçuk Demirel, What Time Is It? (Notting Hill Editions)

The story behind the production of What Time Is It? is essentially meta. What Time Is It? is the result of a continuous battle against time for the sake of literary production. For the sake of material too precious to be lost or put on hold.

John Berger (1928 – 2017) hardly needs any introduction. The award-winning author of the renowned About Looking and Ways of Seeing  would be immensely proud of this finished opus, magnified by Italian translator Maria Nadotti’s introduction.

Notting Hill Editions released this book two years after Berger’s passing. This publication is also proving once again Notting Hill Edition’s legendary sense of tradition in modernity, et vice versa. What Time Is It? is a highly valuable handbook, made for the pleasure of the senses and the joy of knowledge.

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Book Review of Annabel Banks' Exercises In Control by Marc Louis-Boyard for Slow Culture

BOOK REVIEW #5 – Annabel Banks, Exercises In Control (February 2020)

Annabel Banks finally releases her first (and anticipated) collection of stories entitled Exercises In Control (Influx Press), and we loved it. 

Beyond passive recognition, these stories are still resonating in our mind after three readings. You should follow this path, because this book mattered to us more than we could expect. Here are our thoughts on this dangerously delicious selection.

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Portrait of Emma Darwin by JP Masclet

WHY I WRITE VOL.15 – Emma Darwin (Holland House Books)

Bio: Emma Darwin’s new creative non-fiction, This is Not a Book About Charles Darwin (Holland House Books), was published in 2019; it was acclaimed by the Literary Review as ‘unsparingly honest…wise, witty and informative’. She is the author of two historical novels: The Mathematics of Love (Headline Review) – which is probably the only book ever to have been nominated simultaneously for the Commonwealth Writers’ Best First Book, and the RNA Novel of the Year – and A Secret Alchemy (Headline Review). Her non-fiction Get Started in Writing Historical Fiction is published by Teach Yourself / John Murray, she has a PhD in Creative Writing from Goldsmiths, and is a creative writing mentor and tutor with a hugely popular blog, This Itch of Writing (link below).

Picture by JP Masclet.

Why I Write, by Emma Darwin.

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Book Review for Love and Loss and Other Important Stuff by Jonathan Pinnock

BOOK REVIEW #4 – Jonathan Pinnock, Love and Loss and Other Important Stuff

When it comes to cynicism, we used to be disciples of Conan O’Brien: cynicism was our least favorite quality. But that was until we read Jonathan Pinnock’s Love and Loss and Other Important Stuff. We have to remind here that Gareth E. Rees recently started our conversion, but Jonathan truly finished it as soon as we put the book down.

This sudden and instant attraction for cynicism totally justifies the fact that we’re reviewing a 2017 book at the dawn of 2020. Three years is not much for a revelation of that kind. It’s still time to join the club.

Get in the car GIF
C'mon.
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The Emma Press - book covers - Slow Culture

THIS WEEK IN ARTS VOL.3: The Emma Press (books + interview)

Awarded with a grant from Arts Council England only one year after being founded by Emma Wright, The Emma Press has been publishing books for eight years.

Eight years of meticulous combination of quantity and quality, eight years of uncompromising expression, eight years of unwavering determination.

We couldn’t be happier to immerse ourselves into the colorful world of The Emma Press, and couldn’t be more admirative of all the work accomplished so far. 

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Car Park Life by Gareth E.Rees book review cover

BOOK REVIEW #3 – Gareth E. Rees, Car Park Life

Gareth E. Rees’ Car Park Life (Influx press) joins Juliet Escoria’s Juliet The Maniac on the list of our 2019 favorite pieces of non-fiction.

Expecting at first a light read full of entertaining and easy anecdotes, we understood in the first ten pages how rich and enlightening our reading would become.

We do not drive, but Car Park Life immersed us in a scene that is even unknown to your typical retail store wanderer or to your classic car park daydreamer.

Gareth E. Rees’ third book is serious field research. Here begins your sociological journey.

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